The Woods is Healing

12.23.2018 – Sunday

I have been busy. So busy. There was this thing and this other thing and next thing I know it’s been over a year since I’ve posted an update. Of things: I departed Walgreens and started at Shopko Pharmacy. All the usual things about changing jobs could be said, but oh, here we go again. I’m departing Shopko Pharmacy (mine wasn’t one of the 69 whose files were sold and closed). I will now become a Meijer Pharmacist. They are new up here and I’m looking forward to starting.

My family is well. I have been industrious in my hobbies and we continue to take an abundance of camping trips and enjoy the outdoors of Upper Michigan. Perhaps I’ll get off track and post about some of the woodworking I’ve been doing. With wit and humor I often say I sell drugs to support my hobbies. No plans to do fine woodworking as a profession as of yet.

Last time I sat at my desk and typed out a post it was less than upbeat. I was optimistic but ultimately a bit defeated about the state of the forest. After the clean up I decided it was time for a new chainsaw. The Husqvarna 576XP was a good choice and has served me well this past year. After cutting 15 cord of hard maple here at home and slabbing several large oak logs in Wisconsin, it has proven to be a fine machine. The 42″ Panther Pro II Alaskan mill and Pferd Chain Sharp CS-X file have been fantastic additions as well. Milling logs is pretty simple – so long as you keep an eye on safety and keep up on machine maintenance.

  • Sharpen often
  • Keep the bar oiler full, and sprocket well greased
  • Run a slightly richer 40:1 fuel:oil mixture
  • Use Husqvarna Pro 2-cycle oil
  • Premium gasoline / no ethanol only
  • Run 80-90% throttle and watch for signs of a dirty air cleaner
  • find someone to help! Logs are heavy
  • Run a 10° rip chain

The new saw and the Alaskan mill were tested at the cabin on a fallen maple tree with a sizable burl. Since this log, I’ve milled oak logs up to 38″ diameter and I continue to be pleased with the performance of my equipment.

09212017

09212017a

09212017b

We found Shaggy Mane mushrooms this year and learned how not to cook them, and to avoid picking any mushroom growing in a sandy/gravely area – unless the texture of sand and grit is tolerable to you.

09282018

The clean up continued and finished up in early winter 2017. The Ol’ man made friends with the processor and skidder operator and furnished them with the occasional venison product or fermented beverage at the end of their work day. Dad’s hospitality was appreciated and our road from gate to cabin was left in a fine state.

10142017

The machines of modern forestry are impressive, especially compared to our Honda Pioneer 1000 SxS.

10142017a

10142017e

When winter arrived at the end of 2017 the logging was finished. If you look closely you’ll see the cabin off in the distance. I can still see the shadows of the tall poplar trees in my mind.

IMG_0297

Winter arrived and departed. With every trip to the cabin I would take a load of wood home. A few trees that had fallen near the boundary where our land borders state land were processed into logs and left in piles for us. Over summer, an honest three cord was hauled out and stacked under the woodshed roof at home.

05122018

05122018a

05122018b

The leaks came in thick this year. We should be stocked for the next 12 months! The daughter loves to forage.

05122018f

The little guy loves snakes!

08252018f

One year later, the clear cut is thick with six foot tall big toothed aspen saplings. In another year or two there will an impressive 12 foot high hedge a forty deep between the  cabin and the nearest through road.

09182018

09182018b

The Oldest is up to something.

09182018c

09182018d

The Mullen was abundant, springing up along with the big toothed aspen in the clear cut. It should make fine tea once the flowers have dried out.

09182018f

The forest is full of new life. The woods is healing.

 

 

 

Advertisements

One thought on “The Woods is Healing

  1. Nate R

    Thanks for the update, I’ve been wondering how forest cleanup and such was going!

    Good to see how fast the Bigtooth grows back. My family’s 40 in NE WI is just getting done with some logging operations, and I’ve been wondering how fast the Aspen will regenerate.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s